FAQs

  • What is the first appointment like?  Your first appointment is an evaluation.  It is usually 60-90 minutes long.  We will discuss your concerns, symptoms, mental and physical health history.  We will work together to create a treatment plan.
  • What should I bring to my first appointment?  A list of all of your current medications, along with their doses. Some people prefer to bring the prescription bottles. I need to know EVERYTHING that you are on even if it is not related to mental health.  Please also bring a list of past psychiatric medications, doses and, if known, the length of time you were on them.
  • I’m not sure what type of appointment to schedule? Everyone starts with an evaluation.  During your evaluation, we will determine if you need medication, therapy, or both.  
  • I’d like to come in but I don’t have a babysitter.  Your children are welcome to come! I will write any sensitive questions down so big ears don’t overhear.
  • How often will I need to come?  For medication management, I typically see people monthly until we agree you are stable on the medication. Followup appointments are then every three months. Theses are important to ensure you are receiving the best quality care.   Psychotherapy is weekly or every other week.  Once we have worked through your goals, you are welcome to come monthly.
  • Will you do blood work?  If you have not had any blood work done in the last 6 months,  I will give you a lab slip.  Otherwise, I can obtain most lab work from your primary care provider (PCP).
  • Will I receive a prescription after the initial evaluation? Most people do.
  • I’m on the fence about medication. Is that OK?  Absolutely!  We will discuss your options.  If you need more time to consider them, we can always follow up later.  Medication is a personal choice.
  • Will you coordinate with my therapist, PCP, or other providers? Yes!

A final note.  I believe your mental health treatment is composed of three factors: medication, therapy, and “life stuff”.  Medication is a tool that can help you better cope with life and augment therapy.    For some people, it is all they need to feel better.  Most people, however, need a combination of therapy and medication.    You are welcome to seek therapy elsewhere.  In fact, many patients are referred to me from their therapist for medication management. The last category “life stuff” is composed of everything from what you eat and drink to the relationships you keep and the work you do. I believe it is the most important determinant of mental health. Therapy and medication can often help you make positive “life stuff” changes.

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